The “Core” Secret to Success

By: Erin E. Ducat DC, CSCS, CCSP, DACRB

Chiropractic Physician in Bloomingdale, IL – Board-Certified in Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation

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Me after the Fox Valley Half Marathon with my sleepy boys.

In the last week, I’ve been able to topple several physical roadblocks that had been standing in my way for years.  I was able to complete a half marathon in 2 hrs 18 min (personal record by 4 minutes), back squat my body weight, do 60 burpees and completed 75 20″ box jumps.  For some people these goals seem purely athletic, but they are directly related to my ability to do my job, play on the floor with my kids and make it to the end of the day without pain.

“Proximal Stability Before Distal Mobility” – Signature Principle of Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation

The secret to my success was not training harder or running farther.  I’ve been trying that approach for years without getting anywhere.  Instead I worked on proximal stability – strengthening my core in a neutral spine position – on a daily basis for a week.  I used old fashioned exercises such as planks, side planks, Vele’s lean, bird dog and kettlebell carry.  Nothing exotic.

The Bird Dog Exercise

Within a day of starting my new routine, I noticed my back and neck muscles were much less tight.  The next day, my hips were much looser — I could do a third world squat.  Later in the week, I noted my feet were looser too.  No need to roll out my plantar fascia.  Then I started trying things like burpees and box jumps.  These were exercises I simply couldn’t do a week prior.  Now they were no problem.

Did I get that much “stronger” in a week?  No, not really.  The difference was that I reminded my brain what it is like to have a stable core and to move my extremities around it without wobbling.  That’s all I needed to decrease the protective “tightness” in my hips, feet and neck that were keeping me from completing these exercises (and being comfortable on the floor with my kids).

After seeing these positive gains, I’ve been trying out this principle in the rehab exercises I assign best-leg-workout-box-jumppatients.  There is really no downside to the approach and the worst case scenario is that they would have a stronger core.  If you ignore the few groans and moans about having to do some core strengthening, the feedback has been promising.  The only catch is that you have to perform the exercises 1-2x/day for about 10-15 minutes.  Carving that time into your routine can be challenging, but after you see the results, it becomes a lot easier!

DErin E. Ducat DC, CSCS, CCSP, DACRBr. Erin E. Ducat is a Chiropractic Physician, who is Board-Certified in Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation.  She also is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and maintains a private practice in Bloomingdale, IL.  Dr. Ducat has been the team chiropractor for professional and youth sports and treats a variety of orthopedic, sports and pelvic floor conditions for the communities of Bloomingdale, Roselle, Itasca, Medinah and surrounding suburbs.  For more information about Dr. Ducat, go to www.ducatchiropractic.com.

 

 

 

Erin E. Ducat DC, CSCS, CCSP, DACRB, FACO

Erin E. Ducat DC, CSCS, CCSP, DACRB, FACO

Dr. Erin E. Ducat is a Chiropractic Physician, who is Board-Certified in Orthopedics, Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation.She also is a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and maintains a private practice in Bloomingdale, IL.Dr. Ducat has been the team chiropractor for professional and youth sports and treats a variety of orthopedic, sports and pelvic floor conditions for the communities of Bloomingdale, Roselle, Itasca, Medinah and surrounding suburbs.For more information about Dr. Ducat, go to www.ducatchiropractic.com.
Erin E. Ducat DC, CSCS, CCSP, DACRB, FACO

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